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Fair Use Question of the Month: Art from Logos

planeDear CMSI,

I am mounting an exhibition that involves art that features reproductions of many corporate logos. Do I have to license all these logos? And do I have to blur them out on the images representing the exhibition on my website? Read more...

Three Questions about Interactive Storytelling at Tribeca

TribecaTFI Interactive, Games for Change and Storyscapes this year were, as in the past, wildly stimulating and provocative experiences at the Tribeca Film Festival. But I found myself wondering if in the interactive space we’re ready to get a little definition on what we’re talking about. Read more...

Evangelicals, Dictators, Zealots and Engineers: Documentaries Take Us Inside Other Realities at Tribeca


DemocratsAt Tribeca Film Festival this year, four exceptional documentaries built their success on exploring personalities, situations and ideologies alien to the typically liberal documentary audience. For anyone who wants to make media that matters, these films provide models for exploring difference. Read more...

Yes, You Can Riff on Popular Culture—with Fair Use

Everett CollectionThe judge’s decision in the “Three’s Company” fair use case makes inspirational reading. For copyright geeks, it’s practically poetry. And for anyone else, it’s good news that the judge so eloquently defends the right to reuse copyrighted material when creating new culture. That’s a defense against the self-censorship that happens when speech is chilled for fear of copyright infringement. Read more...

Journalists Get Fair Use Spectacularly Wrong

Set of Principles in Fair Use for JournalismYou’d think they’d never created a Set of Principles in Fair Use for Journalism, the way some journalists have fumbled the chance to clarify their fair use rights.

It all began with a belated licensing demand to journalism outlets by the guy who shot the video of a South Carolina cop murdering Walter Scott.  His Australia-based publicist could be forgiven—barely—on grounds of ignorance for making up a fanciful interpretation of fair use, which is U.S. law. Read more...